Gangnyeongjeon Hall

Gangnyeongjeon Hall 2015-06-05T19:31:25+00:00
Gangnyeongjeon Hall, where the king resided and rested at Gyeongbokgung Palace

Gangnyeongjeon Hall, where the king resided and rested at Gyeongbokgung Palace

Gangnyeongjeon Hall, named after the virtue of health, served as the living quarters and resting area for the king. It was first constructed in 1395. The king also met with his entourage here to discus daily activities, state affairs, and office duties.

Gangnyeongjeon Hall was built in a checkerboard pattern of fourteen rectangular chambers and corridors. The king would use the central chamber. Court attendants who assisted, served, and protected the king resided in the other chambers.

A woldae, or elevated stone platform, is located in front of the structure.

Over the years, the building was twice destroyed. It was first demolished by the Japanese in 1592 during their invasion of Korea. It was then destroyed by a fire in 1867. Both times, the hall was rebuilt.

The Japanese, who occupied Korea between 1910 and 1945, decided to disassemble the building, and nearby Gyotaejeon Hall. With these materials, the Japanese rebuilt Huijeongdang Hall at Changdeokgung Palace which was burnt down by a fire in 1917.

Between 1994 and 1995, the current hall as seen today was rebuilt and restored to its original design and features.