Yanghwajin Foreigners’ Cemetery

///Yanghwajin Foreigners’ Cemetery
Yanghwajin Foreigners’ Cemetery 2016-03-07T16:46:12+00:00
Yanghwajin Foreigners’ Cemetery in Seoul

Yanghwajin Foreigners’ Cemetery

Yanghwajin Foreigners’ Cemetery is an international cemetery designated by King Gojong that holds the tombs and graves of many foreign missionaries. The cemetery is also known as Hapjeong-dong International Cemetery.

The need for a foreign cemetery in Seoul was apparent in July, 1890 after the death of John Heron, a Presbyterian minister. Up until this point, foreigners were often buried at Chemulpo Foreigners’ Cemetery in Incheon.

A medical missionary, Dr. Horace Allen, searched and found a place for a cemetery. He obtained the rights to the land on the banks of the Han River. He called the cemetery Yanghwajin after the name of an old ferry crossing. In 1885, Dr. Allen became the director of Gwanghyewon, the first western style hospital in Korea. Dr. Allen died in 1932 and is buried in this cemetery.

A quote on the tomb of Homer Hulbert (1863-1949) reads “I would rather be buried in Korea than in Westminster Abbey.” He was an independence activist from Japan and today is highly respected.

Damaged tombstones most likely caused  during the Korean War at Yanghwajin Foreigners’ Cemetery in Seoul

Damaged tombstones most likely caused during the Korean War

The tomb of Homer Hulbert, a supporter of Korean independence at  at Yanghwajin Foreigners’ Cemetery in Seoul

The tomb of Homer Hulbert, a supporter of Korean independence

Many of the tombstones were damaged during the Korean War (1950-1953). Evidence of this damage still exists today as members of the foreign community decided against repairing many of the fractured tombs. The designs of the tombs found here are western in style, which is unique for Korea.

It is estimated that there are 376 people buried here (221 adults and 133 children). There are also an additional 23 unmarked graves. Buried here are missionaries from all over the world including the United States, Australia, Japan, Korea, Russia, and Europe.

On the other side of Yanghwajin Foreigners’ Cemetery is the Jeoldusan Martyr’s Shrine.

A quote by Ruby Kendrick at Yanghwajin Foreigners’ Cemetery in Seoul

A quote by Ruby Kendrick

Unique tombs and headstones at Yanghwajin Foreigners’ Cemetery in Seoul

Unique tombs and headstones

Read more about other cemeteries in Seoul.



Sights

Jeoldusan Martyrs Shrine

Jeoldusan Martyrs Shrine Thumb


Jeoldusan Martyrs' Shrine is a Catholic shrine on the Han River dedicated to those who gave up their lives during the Byeongin persecutions of 1866. In late 1866, nine French missionaries were martyred. This caused two attempted invasions into Korea by a French fleet. After the attempted invasions, the Joseon government punished, targeted, and brutally murdered many French and native Korean Roman Catholics. The place became known as "beheading mountain."

Read more about Jeoldusan Martyrs Shrine


Directions To Yanghwajin Foreigners Cemetery

  • Take Subway Line 2 or Line 6 to Hapjeong Station (Exit 7)

Hours

Fees

  • Free